Canadian Mining Association Adopts New Tailings Recommendations

Suncor mature fine tailings

The Canadian Mining Association has agreed to implement a new set of guidelines aimed at improving tailings storage practices. In the wake of the Mount Polley incident, Canada’s principal mining industry group has agreed to adopt a raft of new waste management policies.

Tailings have been in the news recently following several major spillages, and the industry is responding by tightening up codes of practice to ensure better waste management becomes the norm.

Following Mount Polley, when mining waste was accidentally released into Canadian lakes and rivers, an independent review was commissioned by the B.C. government. The Chief Inspector of Mines weighed in, finding that geological features under the dam including a layer of clay weren’t taken into account at the design stage. The CIM found that while mining operations there didn’t break any laws or regulations, they didn’t meet best practices either. In response, the Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennet announced in 2014, the government planned new regulations that would make British Columbia a world leader in tailings storage.

The government-commissioned review, completed in January last year, recommended that all mining companies operating in the region should abide by the MAC’s code of best practice: in response the MAC organized its own independent review, seeking to improve that code.

The raft of 29 recommendations will extend tailings policy in both directions – up and in, to the heart of mining companies with tailings ponds or storage, and out to the communities nearby. MAC chief executive officer Pierre Gratton said in December, ‘Everyone of these recommendations, if it’s going to reduce the incidents, we want to implement as quickly as possible.’

Communities who may be affected by tailings incidents are to be involved in accident response planning and training, reflecting increased recognition within the industry of local communities as stakeholders in the industry. Meanwhile responsibility for signing off on tailings measures will be taken into the C-suite, effectively making the core of the company responsible for tailings.

Other measures recommended by the government review include the phased introduction of Best available Technologies, an increased role for tailings review boards and expanded corporate design commitments.

Satellite Surveying for Improved Tailings Monitoring

PhotoSat has extensive experience mapping tailings areas to help improve monitoring and management. We have been providing 20cm accuracy satellite surveying for Suncor’s Millennium Mine about twice a month since 2013, after they compared our mapping to alternative methods. The engineers at Suncor use our elevation data (DEM) for most of the mapping and surveying of their Tailings Reduction Operation. They also use it to help reduce their Mature Fine Tailings inventory.

Satellite ortho photo and PhotoSat elevation image of Suncor’s mature fine tailings

Suncor mature fine tailings

© DigitalGlobe 2014

 

In addition, Golder Associates uses our elevation models for satellite monitoring of the Penasquito Tailings Storage Facility. They presented their results at the Tailings & Mine Waste Conference in Vancouver in October 2015.

To find out more about using our high accuracy elevation models for tailings operations, contact us at info@photosat.ca, or 604-681-9770.