satellite photo of a tailings beach.

Improving Safety for Mine Survey Teams: How Ground Surveying Fits Seamlessly With Satellite Topography

Mine survey teams perform a job that’s increasingly vital, increasingly technological – and more dangerous every day. When they’re doing preliminary work to acquire geophysical data for exploratory purposes, or scouting out pit placement, they’re subject to dangers including rockfalls and environmental dangers that can include severe weather and wild animals. Many mine sites are in inaccessible locations, in rugged terrain far from habitation, where it’s hard to put teams and even harder to get them out again fast when someone gets hurt.

At the same time, the industry is expanding into new regions where mining has previously been carried out with pick and shovel or even literally by hand. In sometimes socially-volatile places where old mine workings don’t show up on maps that are often themselves inaccurate, mine survey teams are saving the lives of miners by supplying engineers with accurate data – but they’re endangering their own safety to do it.

And what about when ground survey teams visit a working open mine to check for bench integrity? They’re sharing their working environment with heavy trucks and putting themselves in the way of slumping bench walls and falling debris.

PhotoSat’s 30cm accuracy satellite topography can provide a solution by filling in part of the puzzle. Mine survey teams will always be needed, but their exposure to risk should be minimized. When you get your elevation data from LiDAR or GPS, it can be significantly slower than PhotoSat’s unique geophysical processing technology. You’ll typically wait weeks, especially for aerial LiDAR. PhotoSat usually provides a client with engineering quality elevation mapping within 5 days, and there’s no boots on the ground so safety risks are minimized.

That doesn’t mean ground survey teams, LiDAR or other scanning technologies are redundant. Just look here to see how one of our clients, Suncor, combines multiple scanning technologies to get the data they need.  In 2014, Suncor and PhotoSat presented on the benefits of incorporating satellite surveying into their survey process for their Tailings Reduction Operation (TRO). With many areas of the TRO cells inaccessible to ground surveyors, the satellite-based technology reduced exposure to hazards.

But it does mean there’s a way to get a fast, engineering quality mine survey that can be used for multiple engineering and planning applications – without putting anyone in harm’s way.

To find out more about PhotoSat’s 30cm accuracy satellite topography for mine surveys, contact us at info@photosat.ca or 604-681-9770.

satellite photo of a tailings beach.

High resolution satellite photo of a tailings beach.

elevation image of a tailings beach

PhotoSat elevation image of a tailings beach