Accelerate Mining Volume Measurements with Satellite Topography

Accurate mine planning requires continually adjusting the plans for the situation on – and underneath – the ground. Resource quantities and locations are changing frequently, and mine layout is affected by blasting, tunneling and ore removal. That’s especially true in open pit mines, but all mining engineers face the difficulty of working with the same digital elevation data while the ground shifts.

In fact, that’s one problem that more efficient communication between the mine face and site and the engineer simply can’t solve, because no one on the ground has a high-level overview either. What’s needed is an update of the original elevation data to reflect what’s happened since.

A common method of doing this is with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). But LiDAR is expensive and time consuming, so we need a mapping system that can be used more often. The only snag is that it has to both deliver similar accuracy and cost significantly less to permit more frequent use.

Step forward satellite topography.

Satellite topography using new, geophysical processing techniques results in similar accuracies to LiDAR and can be used for yearly, quarterly or monthly reconciliations, allowing engineers to work with accurate representations of what’s really happening on the ground. PhotoSat’s satellite elevation mapping for mining volumes has proven accuracies of better than 30cm, providing a clearer picture.

Mining volume changes over an open pit

Volume changes over an open pit mine

 

That means that when it’s time to make volumetric change measurements in pits, stockpiles, waste dumps and tailings, satellite mapping lets you view and analyze the situation simply and easily. Our clients tell us that one of the main advantages of using our satellite system is the ease with which they can check on as-built locations of buildings and structures and reconcile them to the original plan. Reconciliation can even be on a biweekly basis if the project is moving fast. That helps engineers with tailings management, and also makes life easier and safer for on-the-ground surveyors, resulting in greater accuracy and fewer injuries.

How can a satellite system deliver biweekly updates? Partly because after ground-based scans have been acquired, the images have to be compiled. In the case of a system like vehicle-mounted ILRIS (Intelligent Laser Ranging and Imaging) that’s the bottleneck; from raw data to point cloud to the computer processing and satellite location necessary to produce a useable image, nothing much can compete with the 8 days PhotoSat’s technology can take to produce a useable result.

Satellite image with mining volumes

Satellite photo with mining volume changes

 

Finally, using satellites rather than ground-based methods removes the need for surveying to take place on or near the mine site. As a result, the surveying process is safe and never needs to interfere with mine operations. There’s no risk of damage to vehicles or injury to surveying personnel when your imaging is done from space!

To find out more about how satellite topographic mapping can help make mining a safer and more efficient process, leave us a comment or contact us at info@photosat.ca.